Is it time to give your pizzeria a makeover?

Large chains refresh their concepts every seven years or so, and independents should do the same to stay competitive.



 

Q When should I schedule a makeover for my restaurant?

 

A With a new president taking office next year, changes to the tax code—with a potential impact on your profitability—could be on the way. To prepare, first
ensure that the financial statements you receive from your accountant are current. Next, invest in a National Restaurant Association membership—and a state association membership if available—to receive updates on any proposed laws or tax-code changes on the horizon.

Beyond that, it may be time for a makeover. Larger brands refresh every seven years or so, requiring a substantial investment in leasehold improvements. As an independent operator, you need to keep your concept fresh and exciting, too. Have you adopted new technology, such as online ordering? What about adding iPads or kiosks to better organize your kitchen and decrease customer wait time? Have you considered adding digital signage that automatically changes as you move from lunch to dinnertime, or lets you create and show specials on the fly using a back-office computer?

Have you checked out your competition lately? Visit every pizzeria within a three-mile radius of your location, observe customer experiences and take notes. Pay attention to their use of technology, their Internet presence and how easy (or difficult) it is to get key information about their stores—including menu and pricing—in a single online location.

Do you need to improve the quality of your product? Review the ads in this magazine and consult vendors on how you can take your pizzeria to the next level. Participate in PMQ’s Think Tank (thinktank.pmq.com) and ask questions about the best cutting-edge practices, such as online ordering, so you’ll know where other operators are focusing their efforts. Consult a business associate in the chain world—someone outside your geographic area—and ask what they’re doing to improve the customer experience.

Once you’ve identified changes to be made, work with your accountant on costs and pricing and collaborate with your employees to develop a rollout plan that will minimize disruption of your business and maximize the customer experience. Get buy-in from everyone and establish a go-to-market date. Above all, do not let your brand stagnate. Your customers have many dining-out options now, with more on the way. You have to be ready to evolve and grow to stay competitive! 

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

Two Boots, Two Visionaries

A Q&A with Phil Hartman and Leon Hartman, the innovators behind New York-headquartered Two Boots

Two Boots: Meet the free spirits behind amazing pizzas like the Hogwallop, the Dude and the Royal Tenenbaum

The mojo’s always risin’ at this New Orleans-themed network of neighborhood pizza shops that started in New York’s East Village.

The price is fixed: Toppers Pizza tests the waters with a new pricing model for unlimited toppings

We asked Toppers’ VP of marketing how offering unlimited toppings for one price affected the company’s overall sales and food costs.

Five things you need to know to manage a Google Ad Words campaign for your pizzeria

A Think Tank member shares his own experiences and tips for getting the best results from paid Google advertising.

Recipe of the Month: Strawberry and Banana Ciabatta with Nutella

Nutella lets you reimagine the dessert menu possibilities with this sandwich-style item with fresh fruits and served on toasted ciabatta bread.

Product Spotlight - April 2017

Get giant-size buzz with an enormous pizza cutter, and other marketing gems

How to compete in the World Pizza Championship (Hint: Keep the heat off the meat!)

Italian pizza chefs and journalists shed some light on food norms that American pizza makers need to know about for this year’s international contest.

Pop Art, Part 1: How to stage a pop-up event and introduce your brand to an entirely new audience

In part one of a two-part article, three experts chime in on how to make your first pop-up a tip-top success.

One of the industry’s top experts lists 9 steps to a more profitable pizzeria menu

PMQ sat down with menu engineer Gregg Rapp to find out how to offer customers what they want while still maximizing profitability.

Onion and Bacon Linguine

Pasta dishes don’t get much simpler to make—or tastier to eat—than this one from Chef Santo Bruno.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags