This Week in Pizza — February 10

 

Is this really the secret recipe for gangster Al Capone’s favorite pasta sauce? Dominic Capone III, who claims to be ol’ Scarface’s great-nephew, swears it’s legit, one of many recipes seized by G-men in a raid on a mob warehouse and kept secret for 80 years. Desiree Alonzo, president of Capone Family Secret, shared the recipe for Capone’s Original Agli Olio Walnut Sauce with PMQ, and we’re passing it on to you. Try it, and tell us how much you love it! (Who would admit to hating it?)

Don’t make us rub you out—try the recipe already!

 
 

Make February Special with Pies and Vino

Turn National Drink Wine Day (Thursday, Feb. 18) into a moneymaker by pairing your pizzas with the perfect wines. Wine expert Ben Greene offers tips for finding the perfect match for New York-style and Chicago-style pizzas and more.

Click here to make a wine-pizza match.

 
 

Meet the Comeback Kid of Dough-Spinning

Scott Volpe took second-place in last year’s Groupon U.S. Pizza Team Winter Trials—and he wasn’t too happy about it. This year, he came back with a vengeance, transforming into a whirling dervish on the flour-sprinkled stage.

PMQ’s Andy Knef tells the story of Volpe’s big comeback at PMQ.com.

 
 

Hillary Clinton: The Pizza Queen of 2016

Hillary Clinton may not be your choice for president, but you gotta give her credit for one thing: She spends more money on pizza than any of her rivals, and most of it goes to independent operators. According to a Gawker survey, the Clinton campaign shelled out more than $9,000 on pizza between July and December, easily leading the pack of presidential candidates. So what about the two wild men of 2016 politics, the Donald and the Bern?

See how Trump, Sanders and others stack up on the campaign pizza trail.

 
 

John Schnatter Says Failure IS an Option

Before he became famous as the founder of Papa John’s, John Schnatter mowed lawns and flipped burgers at Wendy’s. He also made mistakes, including a Sweet Chili Chicken pizza that never flapped its wings, much less took off. But, as he tells Business Insider, failure is an option for entrepreneurs. In fact, you can learn a lot from it.

Read John Schnatter’s five ingredients for pizzeria success.