As PMQ celebrates its 20th anniversary, we honor the past and look forward to the future in this special oral history.

PMQ’s founders and longtime team members reflect on two decades of progress, pranks, pitfalls and pizza.



(page 7 of 10)

Steve: I think I’m most proud to associate with the quality people in this industry. They’re an unusual mix. You can be successful in so many ways, based on what you bring to the table: showmanship, culinary skills, salesmanship, accounting skills. They find a way to adapt their lives to the business and find unique ways of being successful. I’m so honored to make a living traveling around, not just for the pizza, but for the people—and to share that with others who can benefit from their experiences. 

 

Linda: Pizza industry people are great; they’re hard-working and have a passion for what they’re doing. I’m proud to be a part of it. They’re the most amazing entrepreneurs, the backbone of America. And they’re always problem-solving. I love getting the chance to talk with them, and the vendors that help them succeed.

 

Tom: From when we started until now, I think the core of PMQ is still there: How does a regular guy make it? What makes it night and day are all the things you can do—put the magazine online, have working links, add video. Back then, from design to printer, it’d take eight to 10 days; now, it’s the next day. The quality of the magazine is a lot better.

 

Steve: I think I’m most proud to associate with the quality people in this industry. They’re an unusual mix. You can be successful in so many ways, based on what you bring to the table: showmanship, culinary skills, salesmanship, accounting skills. They find a way to adapt their lives to the business and find unique ways of being successful. I’m so honored to make a living traveling around, not just for the pizza, but for the people—and to share that with others who can benefit from their experiences. 

 

Linda: Pizza industry people are great; they’re hard-working and have a passion for what they’re doing. I’m proud to be a part of it. They’re the most amazing entrepreneurs, the backbone of America. And they’re always problem-solving. I love getting the chance to talk with them, and the vendors that help them succeed.

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