As PMQ celebrates its 20th anniversary, we honor the past and look forward to the future in this special oral history.

PMQ’s founders and longtime team members reflect on two decades of progress, pranks, pitfalls and pizza.



(page 1 of 10)

 

Steve Green, CEO and founder: Before I started PMQ, I had already owned and managed Domino’s Pizza stores in California, New York and Mississippi, but it was my first job in pizza, in 1982, that opened my eyes to the potential of the pizza industry. I found I was good at selling pizza. As a store opening marketing specialist for Domino’s Pizza, I was tasked with creating and executing grand-opening marketing plans.

We broke a new national sales record for a store opening in Tupelo, Mississippi, by using direct mail, door hangers, and boxtopping. We also had a special bicycle built for six that we drove around town. We flyered all businesses and distributed cups with coupons to people on the streets, and we did radio and TV commercials. Since we were a large chain coming to a small Mississippi town, the best approach was to sound personal and local. We took a driver with a great Southern accent and presented him as the head guy [of the franchise]. Pizza Hut was so upset, they ordered a hot air balloon to give rides to people in town. So I got a local farmer with a plane carrying a streamer that said “Domino’s Pizza Delivers” to buzz his balloon ride. The newspapers picked it up, saying, “There’s a pizza war going on in Tupelo!” We ended up setting a new national sales record of $37,000, which stood for ten years.

I also created something called Green Mail. We were the first to take sales receipts and put them in a computer, creating databases and direct mail programs, measuring results. Then, while doing direct marketing for five regional chains, I started publishing a newsletter called Pizza Marketing Quarterly. The whole focus was on selling pizza. We started getting subscribers. I sold, printed, wrote and edited it and sent it out to our list of 10,000 pizzeria operators. It was very well-received and easy to write. My first four issues were basically case studies with real stories and real results from my own clients. The first issue was 36 pages, but within a year or so we grew to 68 pages. Linda came in on the second issue. I convinced her she could make more money selling ads for PMQ.

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

Chef’s Corner: Pizzaiolo and rock musician Mick Mahan hits us with his best pizza shot.

In this exclusive Q&A, Pat Benatar’s bassist, owner of Parma Pizzeria Napoletana, talks about his love for all pizza styles and serving pies to rockers from REO Speedwagon, Toto and more.

Astoria: Pizza and espresso are a match made in Italy

Nothing compliments an Italian dessert like a well-made espresso or specialty coffee drink made with Astoria espresso machines.

Season’s eatings: How to harvest a bumper crop of profits throughout the year

Stuck in a rut? Start using fresh, local and seasonal ingredients to rejuvenate your pizzeria’s menu while keeping your food dollars in the community.

5 effortless ways to improve your digital menu board and sell more pizza

With digital signage, your customers can see your menu in larger-than-life living color. Here’s how to use them to increase your sales and improve customer service.

The 2018 Pizza Power Report: A State-of-the-Industry Analysis

To stay competitive in the pizza business in 2018, independents will have to meet customers’ growing demand for speed, customization, delivery and convenience.

10 or 12? Advice on portion sizes for wing offerings

Will a six-count snack deal fly, and what’s the next step up from there?

Italian certified ingredients dominate the conversation at World Pizza Forum

PMQ's Missy Green takes a deeper look at the "Made in Italy" phenomenon.

What's Your Story? A pair of successful restaurateurs find a higher purpose with Little Box Pizza

This new concept with a conscience uses the power of pizza and small business ownership to turn lives around.

Get the gluten out with DeIorio's Fresh Prosciutto Gluten-Free Pizza

Serve your customers this prime pie made with fresh prosciutto, garlic and DeIorio's gluten-free pizza shells.

Will putting eggs in your dough leave you with egg on your face?

When it comes to improving your crust, eggs aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags