As PMQ celebrates its 20th anniversary, we honor the past and look forward to the future in this special oral history.

PMQ’s founders and longtime team members reflect on two decades of progress, pranks, pitfalls and pizza.



(page 1 of 10)

 

Steve Green, CEO and founder: Before I started PMQ, I had already owned and managed Domino’s Pizza stores in California, New York and Mississippi, but it was my first job in pizza, in 1982, that opened my eyes to the potential of the pizza industry. I found I was good at selling pizza. As a store opening marketing specialist for Domino’s Pizza, I was tasked with creating and executing grand-opening marketing plans.

We broke a new national sales record for a store opening in Tupelo, Mississippi, by using direct mail, door hangers, and boxtopping. We also had a special bicycle built for six that we drove around town. We flyered all businesses and distributed cups with coupons to people on the streets, and we did radio and TV commercials. Since we were a large chain coming to a small Mississippi town, the best approach was to sound personal and local. We took a driver with a great Southern accent and presented him as the head guy [of the franchise]. Pizza Hut was so upset, they ordered a hot air balloon to give rides to people in town. So I got a local farmer with a plane carrying a streamer that said “Domino’s Pizza Delivers” to buzz his balloon ride. The newspapers picked it up, saying, “There’s a pizza war going on in Tupelo!” We ended up setting a new national sales record of $37,000, which stood for ten years.

I also created something called Green Mail. We were the first to take sales receipts and put them in a computer, creating databases and direct mail programs, measuring results. Then, while doing direct marketing for five regional chains, I started publishing a newsletter called Pizza Marketing Quarterly. The whole focus was on selling pizza. We started getting subscribers. I sold, printed, wrote and edited it and sent it out to our list of 10,000 pizzeria operators. It was very well-received and easy to write. My first four issues were basically case studies with real stories and real results from my own clients. The first issue was 36 pages, but within a year or so we grew to 68 pages. Linda came in on the second issue. I convinced her she could make more money selling ads for PMQ.

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

Recipe: The Chicken Bacon Ranch Pizza from DeIorio’s

If your customers love ranch dressing and buffalo sauce, you can’t go wrong with this pizza recipe from DeIorio’s.

Playing with fire: Experts offer their top tips for working with wood-fired pizza ovens

From dough preparation to finishing flourishes, a wood-fired oven demands more knowledge and expertise than a modern oven.

Our Town America: Now offering POS integration for ease of use for larger brands

Using a mobile app, pizzeria owners can track who redeems their offers, then follow up with a second offer.

Pizzeria operators can turn heads with signature menu items from Caputo


Leading industry cheese manufacturer Caputo offers custom cheese solutions to inspire application innovation.

Cut waste and excess fat from your pizzas with StitZii box liners

StitZii’s grease-absorbent pizza box liners let pizzeria owners deliver a healthier pizza and protect the environment.

As technology advances and communications platforms keep changing, the pizza business remains a people business

With a phone in every pocket, who would have guessed talking on those phones would become so passe?

Double your pizza production with Marra Forni

The double-mouth oven makes for twice the efficiency and twice the versatility.

Data breaches: A restaurant operator’s worst nightmare

When it comes to protecting your POS data from hackers and thieves, the IRS recommends following these 5 steps.

Boosting traffic to your pizzeria: Does it pay to advertise on Yelp?

Yelp’s a powerful influencer for restaurant customers, but Think Tank users say you can get a better return for your money with another ad strategy.

Can par-baked crusts save time during rush periods?

According to Tom “The Dough Doctor” Lehmann, par-baking your dough skins for later use has its advantages and disadvantages.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags