How to solve your bubble troubles

Depending on the type of sauce you’re using, bubbly crusts may be linked to insufficient moisture evaporation.



 

Q: We seem to have more problems with bubbly pizza crusts when we use our white sauce, buffalo sauce, BBQ sauce or even no sauce, compared to our marinara sauce. We wind up frequently having to remake those pizzas. What are we doing wrong?

A: Sauce can certainly have an impact on bubbles in your pizza crust. The problem stems from the baking temperature for the type of sauce applied to the dough skin. For example, when you bake a crust with a tomato-based sauce, the water in the sauce evaporates and cools the top of the pizza, preventing (or at least significantly reducing) the incidence of bubbling. When another type of sauce is used, or if a lesser amount of sauce is applied to the skin, the top of the dough quickly overheats, resulting in both gas and moisture expansion under the top of the dough skin. This leads to the formation of bubbles in your crust.

Your best solutions: Either bake those crusts made with alternative sauces at a lower temperature—about 400° to 450°F—or apply more sauce to the skin. With that in mind, you might try diluting the sauce by 20%—in other words, adding 20% water to the sauce based on the sauce’s total weight—then adding 20% more sauce to the skin. The added water will help prevent bubbling; the moisture will boil off during baking so that your actual amount of sauce will be the same as it was before. I’m estimating that an additional 20% of water is a good starting point, but I can’t say for sure. You may want to start at 15% and experiment from there.

 

Q: I just read your last article (“The Advantages of Instant Dry Yeast,” August 2016) and wondered if you could tell me how to convert from compressed yeast to instant dry yeast (IDY). What’s the conversion formula?

A: To convert compressed yeast to IDY, use 40% as much IDY as compressed yeast. Example: Convert 16 ounces of compressed yeast to IDY by multiplying 16 x 40% or 16 x .4, which yields an answer of 6.4 ounces. You can round it up to 6.5 if you prefer. 

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

Should You Be Buying New Equipment Before the Tax Year Ends?

Mike Rassmussen breaks down the do's and don'ts of equipment purchases prior to December 31.

Chef's Corner | Shawn Randazzo Explains His Philosophy Behind Detroit-Style Pizza

Shawn Randazzo, master of the Motor City pizza, teaches you all you need to know about Detroit-style pies so you don’t have to hear it through the grapevine.

December 2018: The 2019 Pizza Power Report and more!

Detroit-style pizza, cheese trends, chicken wings and more marketing tips.

Quick-Fire Questions with The Dough Doctor

Tom “The Dough Doctor” Lehmann provides rapid-fire responses to operators’ minor dilemmas.

Make Your Wing Sales Soar With These Insights From Operators

Chefs report on the hottest flavor trends and innovative cooking techniques for pizza’s best companion: the chicken wing.

The Best Local Marketing to Find You Long-Term Pizza Customers

What cheese trends are taking off in restaurants across the country? Experts and operators weigh in.

Your restaurant should be making the most out of your cheese choices.

Detroit-Style Is Motown's Favorite Pizza

Airy dough, crispy crust and signature caramelized cheese makes Detroit-style pizza an instant winner on any pizza lover’s list.

The 2019 Pizza Power Report: A State-of-the-Industry Analysis

To stay competitive in the pizza business in 2019, independents will have to meet customers’ growing demand for speed, customization, delivery and convenience.

How to make the most of your mozz

A staple at every pizzeria, mozzarella shines for its versatility in everything from apps and salads to pizza and pasta.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags