Edit ModuleShow Tags

Romans armed with scissors are creating a worldwide pizza sensation

It takes time, but anyone can learn how to make Roman-style pizza at the Roman Pizza Academy.



 

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither is Roman-style pizza. The dough for Roman pizza, also known as pizza in teglia or pizza al taglio, takes 72 to 96 hours to prepare and results in an incredibly light, chewy, crunchy, and airy pizza crust which can be topped with just about anything. It’s not a complicated process, but it takes time to learn—and anyone can at the Roman Pizza Academy. 

The Roman Pizza Academy grew out of an increased demand for specialized pizza skills and renewed interest in Roman pizza al taglio. “Pizza in teglia is unique,” says Massimiliano Saieva, lead instructor at the academy. “It’s not Sicilian. It’s not focaccia. It’s not ‘pan pizza.’ What you want is a firm, highly digestible crust with large, honeycomb-like air pockets.” 

Roman-style pizza will allow you to cut back on preparation time during rush hours, because most of the preparation is done in advance, leaving you more face time with customers during service. Although the rise time for the dough is long, serving pizza al taglio is a snap. Each one is par-baked and topped, ready to be cut with the traditional scissors, and finished off in the oven. “Americans like to see their food in advance,” says Saieva. “The Chipotle model has shown us that. Pizza al taglio gives you a beautiful display to catch your customers’ eye.”

The texture of the crust allows tremendous versatility with toppings, unlike traditional round wood-fired pizzas, which usually can only support one or two toppings without affecting the quality of the bake. Toppings are limitless, but the high-end toppings are what really make this pizza shine: Porcini mushrooms, pistachio cream, truffle shavings and smoked salmon are just a few. Your creativity is the only limit.  

The Roman Pizza Academy teaches you not only how to make great pizza al taglio, but also offers everything you need to open your own pizzeria, including consultation, ingredients, equipment, and tools.  

Classes vary depending on how much experience you already have in pizza and where you want to take your new skills. “The majority of our students already own a pizzeria and are looking to make a change,” says Saieva. “We can help with either established classes at our school or on location, where we teach you in your own working environment.”

To find out more, visit their website at www.romanpizzaacademy.com.

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

What's Your Story? Skinny Bitch Pizza, Los Angeles, California

One entrepreneurial woman has found a niche with her delivery-only concept that serves cauliflower crust pizzas in photogenic pink boxes.

Fredi Bello: The Richest Man in the World

Fredi the Pizzaman may be one of the “little guys” of the pizza industry, but his integrity and passion make him a large presence in Michigan.

Do You Have the Fire Within to Go Mobile?

A Fire Within mobile wood-fired oven lets pizzeria owners take their signature taste out into the community.

The Chef’s Corner: Brittany Saxton, Six Hundred Downtown

This five-time world champion shares her recipe for the Mad Hatter.

What’s Your Story? Mert Sunnetcioglu, Mia Mia’s Pizzeria

How this ex-engineer quadrupled sales at his pint-sized pizza shop in just over three years.

How to Achieve a Better Par-Baked Pizza Crust

Use these 5 tips to finetune your par-bake dough formula.

Look Before You Lease: Choosing the Right Site for Your Pizzeria

Veteran operator Michael Androw details 7 key factors to consider when negotiating a lease for your next restaurant space.

Mixers to the Max: Getting the Most out of Your Dough Mixer

Experts help you choose the right model and features to keep your mixer in tip-top shape.

SpeedLine Solutions: How to Save Money on Credit Card Fees and Chargebacks:

Speedline’s Pay@ The Door lets pizzerias accept payment at the customer’s door upon delivery.

Marra Forni: Made in the USA vs. Imported Brick Ovens

Marra Forni founder Francesco Marra explains why buying domestic ovens is a better investment for pizzeria owners.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags