Strombolini with Neapolitan-Style Flour

Add this scrumptious recipe from Bay State Milling to your menu and you can make a claim to Stromboli fame in your market



Bay State Milling

 

Ingredients:

453.59g Neapolitan-style pizza flour

9.07g salt

2.72g active dry yeast

294.84g water, 90°F

180g fresh buffalo mozzarella

22g fresh basil leaves, whole

135g Genoa salami

135g pepperoni

22g prosciutto

15g Parmesan cheese, finely shredded

 

Directions:

To make the dough, add the water to a mixing bowl fitted with a dough hook, then add dry ingredients. Mix on low for 5 minutes, just bringing ingredients together. Remove dough from the bowl, cover and allow it to ferment at room temperature for 18 hours. Gently divide and round dough into 3 equal balls. Cover dough balls and allow them to rest at room temperature for 1 hour.

Gently hand-stretch the dough to a 12”-long rectangle. Layer mozzarella, basil, salami, pepperoni and prosciutto onto ⅔ of the rectangle. Gently roll the dough to seal in the fillings. Roll the Strombolini baguette-style, tapering at the ends. Make five diagonal slits in the top of the roll and top with finely shredded Parmesan.

Place the Strombolini onto a pizza peel dusted with coarse cornmeal and place onto a preheated hearth or pizza stone. Bake at 600°F for 8 to 10 minutes. Remove the Strombolini from oven and allow it to cool approximately 5 minutes. Slice and serve with a dipping cup of marinara sauce. 

 

The Mysterious Origin of Stromboli

It’s one of those controversies that people love to argue about—who invented stromboli? Some attribute it to Mike Aquino, a Spokane, Washington, man who supposedly invented it in 1964 to kindle the thirst of beer drinkers at his brother-in-law’s tavern. The family of Nazzareno Romano, who owned Ramono’s Pizzeria in Essington, Pennsylvania, begs to differ. They say he created the first stromboli in 1950. Everyone agrees on one point: The sandwich’s name comes from Stromboli, an Ingrid Bergman film that takes place on a volcanic island off Sicily called (you guessed it) Stromboli. Never heard of it? Never mind. Add this delicious recipe from Bay State Milling to your menu, and you can stake your own claim to stromboli fame!

 

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