How to add yeast to your dough

Follow the Dough Doctor’s tips to avoid the common mistakes of yeast management in your pizza dough formula



 

Q Can you offer some tips for mixing and handling yeast prior to adding it to dough?​

 

A I’ve seen many cases of improper yeast management. One pizza maker mixed his instant dry yeast (IDY) in cold water and let it stand for 10 minutes before adding it to the dough. Big mistake! The best way to add IDY is to just place it right on top of the flour when you’re ready to begin mixing. If you want to hydrate it, remember that IDY is very sensitive to water temperature. Place it in an amount of water that’s five times its weight at 95°F. This temperature is important—a variation of as few as 5°F can result in some loss of yeast and fermentative activity. Once the IDY is hydrated in the 95°F water, it can be poured into cold water without any harm. 

Active dry yeast (ADY) needs to be prehydrated for the best performance. Place it in about five times its weight of water at 100°F, stir until thoroughly suspended and wait 10 minutes for activation to begin. Then add it to your regular dough water or right on top of the flour.

Finally, there’s compressed yeast, which is also called brick yeast, fresh yeast or wet yeast—it’s all the same yeast. Some put the yeast into water and stir it to achieve suspension; this doesn’t hurt anything as long as the water temperature is between 45°F and 100°F, but it’s pointless unless you’re using a VCM mixer. (For VCMs, all yeast, regardless of the type, must be suspended in water prior to adding it to the mixing bowl.) The best way to add compressed yeast to dough is to crumble it on top of the flour just before you start mixing. Don’t worry—it will get completely distributed throughout the dough during a normal mixing process of between eight and 10 minutes (or more). I don’t recommend mixing this type of yeast into the water in the mixing bowl with salt and sugar. If you get sidetracked and forget to start the mixer for several minutes, the yeast may be damaged due to extended contact with the salt and sugar. 

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

The Chef's Corner: Will Grant Interview

Will Grant chats with PMQ about restaurant concepts, sourdough pizza, and winning the Caputo Cup.

What’s Your Story? Papa’s Pizza

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, Wilhelm Rodriguez, owner of Papa’s Pizza in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, proved that pizza can move mountains.

The Upper Crust: How Anita and Klime Kovaceski became one of Miami’s culinary power couples

The talented owners of Crust have made pizza success look effortless, but they know the devil is in the details.

Top Marketing Tips and Tricks for April 2018

Ring in the spring by giving your pizzeria a seasonal refresh.

How to Drive More Traffic to a Newer Pizza Store

The first three years in business are usually bumpy for a pizzeria, Think Tankers say, but as long as your sales keep going up, don’t push the panic button.

The Three Common Causes of Soggy Pizza

If your pizza crust won’t stay crispy after it’s baked, keep these tips in mind to better control moisture.

Food Trucks: All the Right Moves

Mobile pizza restaurants present their own unique set of challenges—and there are no shortcuts to success.

No Monkey Business: Service, Quality and Best Prices from King Kong Printing

Connecting to customers through direct mail helps you stand out in a digital world and offers a more personal touch.

Mobile Brick Oven Solutions: Expanding Your Pizza Operation

Marra Forni pizza ovens offer both performance and elegance for your food truck or mobile restaurant.

Is Your Online Customer Service Up to Speed?

Never has the need for speed been more important than in online ordering for pizza restaurants. Speedline has the solution.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags