On a roll

Jeff Zeak discusses lengthening the life of your dough.



QUESTION:

How can I make fresh dough or rolls last longer? It seems wasteful to throw them away at the end of the day.

ANSWER:

I’m going to assume that when you say “rolls,” you mean breadsticks, and that you are using a typical pizza dough formula to make them. Sometimes
when we speak about preservation of finished products made from yeast leavened dough, such as breads and rolls, we are talking about the product remaining free of mold growth for some period of time. Other times, we might be discussing how we can keep the resulting baked products softer longer and avoid characteristics of staling (firming, dryness and off flavors) from developing in the product. Unfortunately, there is no one easy magic bullet (preservative) to add to dough to make the resulting dough and/or finished product last longer. However, there are ways of extending shelf life of some finished baked products through adjustment of ingredients, formulation and/or process. Also remember that these days the word “preservative” is sometimes thought of as a dirty word and is not well-received by the general public. 

In the case of using traditional pizza dough to make breadsticks and rolls, a typical pizza dough formulation is a fairly lean dough (low in fat and sugar), and a fully baked product does not lend itself well to staying fresh (soft) for very long at room temperature. Keeping finished bread and roll products warm and not exposed to direct heat and air movement will help with maintaining good eating characteristics, but after a while they will start to dry out and will become firm and unpleasant to eat. In some cases, gently reheating (refreshing) roomtemperature finished bread and roll products for a short period of time will help to improve eating characteristics and flavor of the product, but be aware that they will not stay that way very long. There really is not much that we can adjust with regards to ingredients and formulation, unless you are willing to do so, and that comes with an increase in ingredient cost. 

One alternative may be to par-bake the breadsticks rather than fully baking them. This would involve making the breadsticks in your usual manner and then giving them a short bake in order to set the structure of the product (3 minutes at your usual bake temperature, or around 465° to 485°F). The par-baked product would be light in crust color and will need to be finish-baked as needed (3 minutes at your usual bake temperature, or around 465° to 485°F) in order to color the crust and warm the breadstick. After cooling, par-baked breadsticks can be stored in a plastic bag or a closed container at room temperature for up to two days. If the storage time is going to be longer than two days, I’d suggest refrigerating or freezing the packaged product shortly after cooling the par-baked product. By adjusting your typical procedure, this would allow you to have fresh breadsticks and not waste the product.

Jeff Zeak is the pilot plant manager for the American Institute of Baking (AIB). Need more dough advice? Visit the Dough Information Center at
PMQ.com/dough.

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

SmartMarket: Pizza Possibilities With Ardent Mills

Make the most out of your dough recipe with a range of Ardent Mills flours, from gluten-free to Italian-style 00.

Idea Zone: Is Your POS System Optimized for Your Pizzeria?

Revel Pizza Solution partners with Apple to bring owners the best in secure, easy-to-use POS systems

Using Video to Draw in Customers is Key to Staying Relevant in the Coming Years

Learn four easy ways you can employ video to effectively attract attention and connect with customers.

PMQ Takes A Tour Through the Museum of Pizza Pop-Up Exhibition in New York

Pizza pop culture invades New York City with a limited-time pop-up, The Museum of Pizza, giving visitors a host of Instagrammable experiences.

Is Your Sauce The Boss? Tips on Successful Sauces

From marinara and pesto to nacho cheese and gravy, pizza insiders share the secrets behind their most successful sauces.

Quad Cities-Style Pizza: Tinkering With Tradition

Quad Cities pizzerias are an eclectic mix of traditionalists and tinkerers who crave change.

Experience Hog Heaven With This BBQ Pork Pizza by Marzetti Foodservice

Marzetti's range of sauces will add a delightful kick to any recipe.

The Benefits of Building Your Own Oven From Scratch

United States Pizza Team veteran Jason Samosky guides us through the ins and outs of building your own wood-fired oven.

Chef's Corner | Pete Blohme Tricks Out a Tasty Treat With Beignets

Serving up beignets, paninis and patriotism in Alabama’s French Quarter, Panini Pete’s fries up a taste of Southern hospitality with these delightful sugar-dusted puffs.

Should You Hire An Interior Designer? The Think Tank Has Some Advice

Think Tankers discuss the ins and outs of hiring a design expert to spruce up their spaces.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags