A need for speed: Tom Lehmann explains why you should not let your pizza dough rest after mixing

Don’t dilly-dally, says the Dough Doctor, when it’s time to cut and ball dough.



 

Q Why do you recommend always taking the dough from the mixer directly to the bench for immediate cutting and balling? Why not let the dough rest for an hour before cutting?

 

A Keep in mind that, while your dough is resting after being mixed, it’s also fermenting, which causes it to change in density—that is, it gets lighter in volume just sitting there. Also, as I mentioned in last month’s column, the yeast in your dough will typically exhibit a lag time of about 20 minutes before it begins actively feeding and producing the by-products of fermentation. By taking the dough directly to the bench for scaling and balling, we can get most or all of the dough balled before the yeast starts doing its thing. There is little change in dough density during this lag time, and the dough will be at its most dense right after the mixing process. Dense dough is easier to cool down than less dense dough. That’s because the improved insulating properties of less dense dough will impede the extraction of heat from the dough balls once they’re placed in the cooler.

This brings us back to a point raised in last month’s column, but it’s worth repeating: If the dough balls can’t be efficiently cooled, the fermentation process will continue in the cooler for a longer period of time and at a faster rate than would be considered optimal for your dough quality and refrigerated shelf life. In fact, under certain conditions, you will very likely end up with blown dough by the next day because the cooler was unable to sufficiently retard the fermentation rate.

 

Q What’s the difference between enriched flour and high-gluten flour?

 

A When we say a flour is high-gluten or high-protein, we’re really referring to the total protein content of the flour. Much of that protein forms gluten, so the higher the protein content, the stronger and more elastic your dough becomes. When we talk about enriched flour, we mean that a vitamin and mineral supplement has been added to the flour to restore it to the nutritional value it would have if it were a whole-wheat flour (minus the fiber content of the wheat bran). Aside from changing the nutritional value, enrichment has no other effect on the flour. 

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

NRA Show 2017: Best of Show

The PMQ staff reviews some of the best moneymaking products on display at the 2017 National Restaurant Association Show.

Recipe: Pizza Dough Twists from Nutella

Nutella puts a tasty new twist on pizza dough with this deliciously sweet post-meal treat.

Use a customized pizza calendar to sell more pizza every day

With a calendar from Menus for Less, you can provide year-round promotions and coupons to your customers without the expense of direct mail.

New mover marketing should be an integral part of any pizzeria’s marketing strategy

Our Town America explains why you should factor this program into your 2018 marketing budget.

Romans armed with scissors are creating a worldwide pizza sensation

It takes time, but anyone can learn how to make Roman-style pizza at the Roman Pizza Academy.

How to turn pasta-making into a crowd-pleasing exhibition

That’s Amore Cheese makes Quattro Formaggi Spaghetti with a giant wheel of Parmigiano-Reggiano—and crowds gather to watch.

What’s the best way to prevent pizza peel stick?

Tom “The Dough Doctor” Lehmann says it starts with choosing the right peel dust, but plain flour is not necessarily the best choice.

Chef Bruno’s recipe for Peasant Pasta Soup

This soup recipe, inspired by Mama Bruno herself, takes only about 30 minutes to make!

The rules of engagement: How to build a better relationship with your distributor

If you’re working with half a dozen distributors and pitting them against each other, you’re going about it all wrong, experts say.

When in Rome: Could Roman-style pizza be the next big moneymaker for your restaurant?

This fast-growing style may be the new Neapolitan, taking the U.S. by storm like Caesar’s troops tearing through Gaul.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags