Study Finds Younger Consumers Crave Human Connection

Younger consumers use technology to enhance their social experiences when dining out, according to study.




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(Press Release) A new study from Culinary Visions Panel's Mindful Dining Initiative™ highlights younger consumers' craving for human connection when dining out. In the study, 1,500 US consumers, 18 years and older, were surveyed about their attitudes towards ethics-based dining and how it impacts their food choices and purchasing decisions outside the home. The study found that despite their love for technology, younger consumers are using it not to replace human interaction but to enhance their social experiences when dining out.

"With more and more restaurants and foodservice establishments turning to technology to solve labor shortage issues, it is important to understand the role of technology in consumers' dining experiences. Our studies show younger adults, in particular, enjoy the social aspects of dining out," says Sharon Olson, Executive Director of Culinary Visions Panel. "Today's younger consumers grew up with technology and their facility with it allows them to use technology to make their lives more convenient," she adds.

Questions on consumer-facing technology were included for the first time since the project began in 2014. Paired with questions related to human interaction, the study provided a rich, complex picture of the needs and wants of younger consumers. Here are four takeaways that the study found on consumer attitudes towards technology and human interaction:

Personal Touch
Despite the fact that younger consumers like to use technology to make ordering quick and error-free, the study revealed that Millennials and Gen Z consumers are some of the most appreciative demographics when it comes to quality customer service and positive in-person interaction. 64% of those surveyed between the ages of 18-34 years said they would love to go to a restaurant where the server calls them by their name. In contrast, 58% of those surveyed between the ages of 35-54 and 54% of those aged 55 and older said the same thing. It seems the pervasiveness of technology has upped the need for quality interaction. As Millennials and Gen Z are some of the most engaged consumers of the digital world, a personal touch in dining experiences outside the home goes a long way.

A Way to Socialize
Dining outside the home is considered a great way to catch up with friends. Young consumers like to share food, swap bites and are, in general, more influenced by what their peers order than their older counterparts. The 2018 Mindful Dining Study found that 50% of the consumers surveyed between ages 18-34 said that their ordering decision is influenced by what others are ordering. In contrast, 37% of those surveyed between the ages of 35-54 and 25% of those aged 55 and older said the same thing. Though it may be just a classic generational difference, younger consumers are far more likely to use the group's preferences to shape their own dining decisions.

Sharing to Socialize
Millennial and Gen Z consumers view dining experiences as social experiences that should be celebrated through sharing on social media. The study found that 58% of the consumers surveyed between ages18-34 said that they like to take pictures to share on social media when dining with a group. In contrast, 44% of those surveyed between the ages of 35-54 and 22% of those aged 55 and older said the same thing. Additionally, 39% of those between ages 18-34 say that they think about whether a restaurant is a good place for photos when going out to eat and 38% say they have dined at a restaurant before with the express purpose of sharing a photo on social media. Breaking bread is a universal experience that all humans can relate to and sharing those experiences with friends on social media is a way of furthering them - not replacing them.

Quick Convenience
Younger consumers may be quicker to embrace technology in foodservice because they value quickness and convenience as a generation. 48% of those between ages 18-34 say they prefer using kiosks or touch screens to order because it's quicker compared to 32% of those between the ages of 35-54 and only 12% of those ages 55 and older. Young consumers' ease in opting for technology when they need quickness and convenience is a reflection on how they use technology as a tool, rather than as a default, to respond to their different dining situations and needs.

With a range of 36% across all three demographics, interest in using technology may be the biggest differentiating factor across generations. However, it is not because younger consumers aren't interested in human interaction. Technology enables and facilitates younger consumers' lives but they don't want it to replace face-to-face customer service. Understanding how Millennial and Gen Z consumers are using technology to enhance their dining experiences will lead foodservice professionals to better understand where to prioritize employee training, as well as menu planning and group promotions.

About Culinary Visions® Panel
Culinary Visions® Panel (www.culinaryvisions.org), a research and trend forecasting firm that conducts surveys in more than 30 countries, explores a wide range of culinary topics with food industry professionals and consumers. The Culinary Visions Panel is a division of Olson Communications (www.olsoncom.com), which is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. For more information on Culinary Visions Panel, please contact by email info@culinaryvisions.org or phone at 312.280.4757. Culinary Visions Panel is a registered trademark of Olson Communications, Inc. Follow Culinary Visions Panel insights on Twitter @OlsonComm.

About the Survey
Culinary Visions Panel's latest study examines consumer attitudes towards ethics-based dining choices outside the home and is part of the Mindful Dining™ Initiative. The Mindful Dining™ Initiative is a project that began in 2014 and is an on-going body of work. In this study, over 1,500 US consumers were surveyed about their attitudes towards ethical eating choices that impacted their behavior for food purchase and dining decisions. The study, titled "Mindful Dining," was published in March 2018. Topics include healthfulness, quality ingredients, natural foods and group dynamics.

To purchase a complete copy of the report contact info@culinaryvisions.org


 

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