How to Drive More Traffic to a Newer Pizza Store

The first three years in business are usually bumpy for a pizzeria, Think Tankers say, but as long as your sales keep going up, don’t push the panic button.




 

Jessica Miller: We’ve been open for a little more than three years. Our customer feedback is amazing, including 4.9 stars on Facebook. We’re doing great on Google and Yelp, too. We’ve also done direct-door marketing, giveaways and Facebook ads. We’ve gotten involved with the community. And yet we’re still struggling. This is a town full of residential neighborhoods, with a lot of places to eat—such as McDonald’s and Taco Bell—but no direct pizza competition. We aren’t on the main strip, so I fear our location is the problem. We’ve cut our food costs and work seven days a week, but we still struggle to make it. Help! Any marketing ideas?

 

RobT: Go back and check your yearly sales since you opened. If they’re going up year over year, just sit tight. I remember that years one to three were a challenge for me. I started seeing better numbers after year four. Also, check your food costs again and make sure nothing is out of whack.

Mondo: I agree with RobT. As long as your sales are still increasing each year, hold tight. The beginning is a grind. When we started, we sometimes wouldn’t even do $100 for the entire day. We are four years in now, though, and as long as sales are still trending in the right direction, I’m happy. When starting out, the best ROI for me was Facebook advertising. Once I started spending $20 a week on Facebook, I started getting more traffic. We did some postcard mailers, too, but those were really expensive and actually worked too well! On the weekend after they went out, we would get swamped and didn’t have the staff to handle it. Then, within a week or two, that extra boost in sales would be gone and we’d be pretty much back to square one.

JTMiller09: Here are a few ideas to help you drive traffic to your store: 1) Develop a marketing calendar. It’s your road map so that you don’t get lost. 2) Take free pizzas to five businesses in your area every week. 3) If there are hotels nearby, pay the desk clerks in gift certificates for referrals/sales. 4) Provide bounce-back offers to local dry cleaners, oil change businesses and full-service car washes. 5) Partner with the local schools in any way possible!

 

Edit Module

Tell us what you think at or email.

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Articles

Idea Zone: North American Pizza & Culinary Academy Opens in Chicago

Made to Order: Tips for Online Ordering

Want to boost your online ordering sales? Use these 6 tips from experts to attract—and retain—today’s web-obsessed customers.

8 Tips for Better Video

Creating great video content doesn’t have to be expensive. Here’s how to do it right on a shoestring budget.

Precinct Pizza: Super Troopers

As a Domino’s franchisee, ex-NYC paramedic Rick Drury didn’t always go by the book. Now he makes his own rules at the wildly successful Precinct Pizza in Tampa.

The Possibilities of Pasta

Get creative with flavor combos, menuing and marketing to create a pasta menu that soars beyond the standard favorites.

New York State of Mind

It’s the pizza that looks the most like, well, pizza. Here’s the story behind America’s oldest and most familiar pizza style.

Caputo Americana Grandma Pie

Orlando Foods puts a spin on a homemade classic with Americana flour and crushed tomato

Art of Marketing-August 2018

Looking for more marketing ideas and insights? PMQ has you covered!

Getting a Better Bake With Air Impingement Ovens

If your pizzas aren’t coming out right, here’s how to put your “finger” on the problem.

Chef's Corner - Laura Meyer

One of the industry’s most acclaimed pizzaioli shares a recipe that’s layered with salty, sweet, smoky and spicy flavors.
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags